Gossip mongering in anonymous social networks isn’t the future of journalism, but it sure seems to be part of it. Journalism has long debated the merits of anonymous sourcing — witness the latest hubbub at The New York Times — but at least in those cases the reporter (and hopefully the editor) know the identity of the speaker. Apps like Whisper take the blind item to a whole new level of blindness. It makes sense that anonymous apps, whose purported purpose is to give users a place to share their innermost feelings and frustrations, could have a second life in the news business. How some journalists are using anonymous secret-sharing apps » Nieman Journalism Lab (via infoneer-pulse)

(via infoneer-pulse)

The Internet is different. With so much information, hyperlinked text, videos alongside words and interactivity everywhere, our brains form shortcuts to deal with it all — scanning, searching for key words, scrolling up and down quickly. This is nonlinear reading, and it has been documented in academic studies. Some researchers believe that for many people, this style of reading is beginning to invade when dealing with other mediums as well. “We’re spending so much time touching, pushing, linking, scroll­ing and jumping through text that when we sit down with a novel, your daily habits of jumping, clicking, linking is just ingrained in you,” said Andrew Dillon, a University of Texas professor who studies reading. “We’re in this new era of information behavior, and we’re beginning to see the consequences of that.” Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say - The Washington Post (via infoneer-pulse)

(via infoneer-pulse)

realmonstrosities:

The many colours and patterns of Burton’s Legless Lizard (Lialis burtonis).

It’s the most widespread of all Australia’s reptiles, and is closely related to geckos of all things.

While geckos are the masters of fancy footwear, Burton’s Legless Lizard eschews such frippery and opts for no legs at all.

Also it’s a master predator who feeds on other lizards by ambushing them and suffocating them in its jaws.

In Australia, life is for the legless.

(via these-trees-see-me)

futurescope:

// Nice Map. Have a look at Germany! Gamma Radiation Sensors all over the place.

prostheticknowledge:

Thingful

An online map that marks and records public Internet-Of-Things projects around the world:

Thingful is a discoverability engine for The Public Internet of Things, providing a geographical index of where things are, who owns them, and how and why they are used.

Today, millions of people and organisations around the world already have and use connected ‘things’, ranging from energy monitors, weather stations and pollution sensors to animal trackers, geiger counters and shipping containers. Many choose to, or would like to, make their data available to third parties – either directly as a public resource or channeled through apps and analytical tools.

Thingful organises ‘things’ around locations and categories and structures ownership around Twitter profiles (which can be either people or organisations), enabling citizens to discuss why and how they are using their devices and data. Because, the ‘who’, ‘why’ and ‘where’ are ultimately far more important in The Public Internet of Things than the ‘what’.

Explicitly built for people, communities, companies and cities that want to make the data from these ‘things’ available and useful to others, Thingful aggregates and indexes public information from some of the major IoT platforms and data infrastructures around the world, providing direct links to datasets and profile pages for the public things that it knows about.

While this is interesting to see the scope of a potential future of internet-controllable objects … you can’t help think that there would be a huge vulnerability and scale of cyber-attacks to home devices that would be unsettling (such as this story where a baby monitor was accessed by a hacker).

You can explore Thingful yourself here

(via emergentfutures)

futurescope:

// Nice Map. Have a look at Germany! Gamma Radiation Sensors all over the place.

prostheticknowledge:

Thingful

An online map that marks and records public Internet-Of-Things projects around the world:

Thingful is a discoverability engine for The Public Internet of Things, providing a geographical index of where things are, who owns them, and how and why they are used.

Today, millions of people and organisations around the world already have and use connected ‘things’, ranging from energy monitors, weather stations and pollution sensors to animal trackers, geiger counters and shipping containers. Many choose to, or would like to, make their data available to third parties – either directly as a public resource or channeled through apps and analytical tools.

Thingful organises ‘things’ around locations and categories and structures ownership around Twitter profiles (which can be either people or organisations), enabling citizens to discuss why and how they are using their devices and data. Because, the ‘who’, ‘why’ and ‘where’ are ultimately far more important in The Public Internet of Things than the ‘what’.

Explicitly built for people, communities, companies and cities that want to make the data from these ‘things’ available and useful to others, Thingful aggregates and indexes public information from some of the major IoT platforms and data infrastructures around the world, providing direct links to datasets and profile pages for the public things that it knows about.

While this is interesting to see the scope of a potential future of internet-controllable objects … you can’t help think that there would be a huge vulnerability and scale of cyber-attacks to home devices that would be unsettling (such as this story where a baby monitor was accessed by a hacker).

You can explore Thingful yourself here

(via emergentfutures)

Relying on age and experience has been the way of the business world since the beginnings of the industrial era in the 18th century. It’s clear to me that in the present and future Information Age, however, older isn’t necessarily better when it comes to brands and services. Myth of Age Experience in Innovation Equation | Bill Donius (via infoneer-pulse)

(via infoneer-pulse)

laboratoryequipment:

Electronic Skin Delivers Drugs, Stores DataAverage life expectancy has nearly doubled since 1800, thanks to progress in medicine. Most of that was made by developing drugs and improving public health services. The medical revolution of the 21st century is going to be different. With greater understanding of our genes, we will need treatments that are more personalized.In pursuit of that goal, researchers have developed a wearable patch that can monitor your health, store and transmit data and deliver drugs when needed. Such a device has instant applications for those suffering from diabetes or heart diseases. In the future it could be used more generally, to keep track of health.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/electronic-skin-delivers-drugs-stores-data

laboratoryequipment:

Electronic Skin Delivers Drugs, Stores Data

Average life expectancy has nearly doubled since 1800, thanks to progress in medicine. Most of that was made by developing drugs and improving public health services. The medical revolution of the 21st century is going to be different. With greater understanding of our genes, we will need treatments that are more personalized.

In pursuit of that goal, researchers have developed a wearable patch that can monitor your health, store and transmit data and deliver drugs when needed. Such a device has instant applications for those suffering from diabetes or heart diseases. In the future it could be used more generally, to keep track of health.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/electronic-skin-delivers-drugs-stores-data

(via kenobi-wan-obi)


Steve Blank on the Next 50 Years of Business Innovation BY Steve Blank, inc.com
In his com­mence­ment speech at ESADE, the entre­pre­neur spoke with the class of 2014 about the future of entre­pre­neur­ship and the role new gen­er­a­tions play in incit­ing change.
Pres­i­dent Bieto, Dean Sauquet, mem­bers of the fac­ul­ty,…

Steve Blank on the Next 50 Years of Business Innovation
BY Steve Blank, inc.com

In his com­mence­ment speech at ESADE, the entre­pre­neur spoke with the class of 2014 about the future of entre­pre­neur­ship and the role new gen­er­a­tions play in incit­ing change.

Pres­i­dent Bieto, Dean Sauquet, mem­bers of the fac­ul­ty,…

(via emergentfutures)

fuckyeahdisneyfanart:

repeat after me everyone: respecting the basic human dignity of oppressed people is more important than having a philosophical discussion about how anger is supposedly the same thing as hatred and how much better the world would be if we were all just nice to each other!!!!!!

because “don’t fight hate with hate” only means so much when you shout it in the faces of the oppressed, but barely whisper it in the direction of the oppressors

(via reverseracism)

scinerds:

Tiny, Logical Robots Injected into Cockroaches


  Nanotechnology just got a little bit smarter.
  
  At the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Israel’s Bar-Ilan University, Ido Bachelet led a team of scientists in building tiny robots that can respond to chemical cues and operate inside a living animal. More than that, they can operate as logic gates, essentially acting as real computers.
  
  That gives the nanobots — on the order of nanometers, or one-billionth of a meter — the ability to follow specific instructions, making them programmable. Such tiny robots could do everything from target tumors to repair tissue damage.
  
  The experimenters used a technique called “DNA origami” to make the robots. DNA comes in a double-helix shape, making long strings. And like yarn, the strings can be linked together to make different shapes. In this case, the researchers knitted together DNA into a kind of folded box with a lid, a robot called an “E” for “effector.” The “lid” opened when certain molecules bumped into it.

scinerds:

Tiny, Logical Robots Injected into Cockroaches

Nanotechnology just got a little bit smarter.

At the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Israel’s Bar-Ilan University, Ido Bachelet led a team of scientists in building tiny robots that can respond to chemical cues and operate inside a living animal. More than that, they can operate as logic gates, essentially acting as real computers.

That gives the nanobots — on the order of nanometers, or one-billionth of a meter — the ability to follow specific instructions, making them programmable. Such tiny robots could do everything from target tumors to repair tissue damage.

The experimenters used a technique called “DNA origami” to make the robots. DNA comes in a double-helix shape, making long strings. And like yarn, the strings can be linked together to make different shapes. In this case, the researchers knitted together DNA into a kind of folded box with a lid, a robot called an “E” for “effector.” The “lid” opened when certain molecules bumped into it.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

futureofscience:

Surgical 3D printing BioPen writes in bone, nerve and muscle
“The BioPen is a handheld 3D printer that can actually print bone directly onto patients during surgery.”

futureofscience:

Surgical 3D printing BioPen writes in bone, nerve and muscle

The BioPen is a handheld 3D printer that can actually print bone directly onto patients during surgery.”

(via silvaria)